The hardest part of being a Christian is actually getting along with other Christians

Gospel of Luke 3:15-16, 21-22

Have any of you ever thought that the hardest part of being a Christian is actually getting along with other Christians? It’s not the faith part or the believing in the life, death, passion, and resurrection of Jesus Christ that presents the most difficulty. It’s not the call to charity, to mercy, or to love the lost, hurting, poor, and vulnerable that causes problems. It’s not even that the entire world and all that is seen, unseen, known, and unknown created by an all-powerful, all-knowing, and all-present God that creates the greatest stumbling blocks. No, typically, the biggest problem with Christianity is having to get along with other Christians.

Am I the only one who feels that way? I am serious… am I the only one who experiences moments of frustration, annoyance, disappointment, and down right anger with other people who are devoted followers of Christ?

On the one hand I hope that I am. I hope that I am the only Christian present who has problems getting along with other Christians. I hope the rest of you have it all figured out and that I am the only one here lacking in Christian charity and love.

However, on the other hand, there is part of me that hopes that I am not. I hope that I am not the only one who struggles with this issue.

I find comfort in believing that I am not the only one who struggles with relationships. I find comfort and hope in the thought that I am not the only believer who has trouble getting along with other believers. Believers who profess the same belief in the same God; believers who profess the same name of Jesus Christ; believers who rely on the same Holy Spirit, and yet, just like me, find it difficult to get along with one another.

Today the Church celebrates the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord. A feast that recognizes our Lord’s voluntary submission for the fulfillment of all righteousness, and the manifestation of his self-emptying for the salvation of mankind, in obedience to the will of the Father. Today, the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord, we are called by the Church to recall the reality of our own baptism in light of the example of Jesus.

There are 4 things that I ask you to reflect upon this morning.

One, I would ask that you reflect upon the new identity of Jesus as revealed in the symbol of the dove and in the words of God the Father, “You are my beloved Son.” That is not to infer that Jesus was not always the Son of God (a many heretic has been burned at the stake, or worse, for such a claim) rather, that Jesus arose from the waters of the Jordan with the identity of service… service to mankind.

Second, reflect upon his obedience to the will of God the Father, “With you I am well pleased.” Jesus submitted himself to God and to his plan for salvation for the world and in so doing, fulfilled all righteousness. Jesus, a man without sin, yet in his holy perfection was obedient to the will of God the Father which was manifested in his baptism.

Third, consider Jesus’s visible demonstration of solidarity with humanity. He shouldered the burden of our sin, for he himself was without sin, and immersed himself in our pain, misery, brokenness, and suffering and carried our burden to the depths of the Jordan and, ultimately, to the height of the cross.

Finally, consider his self-sacrificing love. His baptism was a manifestation of his love for us. A love that was entirely of his free will and entirely for our benefit. A love that calls us to abandon our selfish desires and ambitions, and to cast off all our burdens, and pick up our cross, and follow after him.

I struggle today my dear brothers and sisters in Christ not because my fellow Christians are so difficult to get along with. I struggle today, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ, because I forget the meaning, significance, and reality of my own baptism. A baptism that calls me to live my new identity as a child of God. A baptism that has given me the power to turn away from sin and live in obedience to the will of my Heavenly Father. A baptism that allows me to live in solidarity with you, my brothers and sisters in Christ. A solidarity that joins us together, in spite of our brokenness and pain, to be one in Christ. And finally, a baptism of love. A love that is so grand, so wonderful, so all-encompassing that God the Father gave his only Son for our salvation.

I would like to believe that I am not the only one who struggles living this pilgrim’s journey. I would like to believe that I am not the only one who finds relationships difficult and discouraging. I would like to believe that I am not the only one who needs to be reminded of the example of our Lord, Jesus Christ, and in that example find forgiveness, comfort, and hope.

As you come before this altar to day recall your own identity as a child of God, recall your own call to obedience and submission to the will of God your heavenly Father; recall the solidarity you share with the persons around you; and, finally, recall the self-sacrificing love which has called you, me, and the entire world, including those with whom we quarrel… to eternal salvation.

Author: Deacon Jason

Jason is an ordained Deacon in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Boise and works at Idaho State University. Kristina, his wife, is a public school teacher with over 20 years experience. They have been married since 1996 and have worked hard to overcome the struggles and hardships of stitching together a marriage and family from different starting points. Kristina and Jason possess a unique perspective on marriage and faith and willingly share that perspective in hopes of encouraging others. Their personal belief that sacramental life and marriage are the result of trial has enabled them to find comfort and joy in their vocation and in life. They live in Idaho Falls, Idaho and enjoy the outdoors, especially made better when experienced with family and friends.

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