Travel with Jesus to his home town.

14th Sunday of Ordinary Time, Gospel of Mark 6:1-6

Today’s Gospel immediately follows the events of last week’s Gospel.  If you recall from last week Jesus healed the suffering woman and then raised Jairus’s daughter from the dead.  With these two miracles demonstrating Jesus’s power over human suffering and death fresh in our memories we now travel with Jesus and his disciples to his home town.

We read that Jesus entered the synagogue on the Sabbath and began to teach to an audience that was very familiar to him.  His audience consisted of friends and family who knew him, his history, and his role and function in their community.  Like small towns, communities, and neighborhoods all across the globe, and throughout all of history, once a person has an established role or function in their community it is not easily changed, and this was also true for Jesus.

Several years ago, on a visit to my home town my parents shared with me a conversation they had with my junior high school librarian long after I had graduated high school and moved away.  According to him, while outside working in his front yard, I had driven by his house, yelled his name out the window of my car, and then proceeded to give him the 1-finger salute.

I was absolutely horrified.  I could not believe what they had told me.  I thought for sure that the school librarian had made a mistake, confused me with somebody else.  You must know that; 1) I had no recollection of this incident, and 2) this incident did not reflect my true feelings towards my junior high librarian.  He was the man who introduced me to Walt Morey’s Gentle Ben, the only book I have read more than twice.

The saddest part of this story is that I have no way of setting the record straight.  It is impossible for me to set right this perceived wrong.  My junior high school librarian is no longer alive.  As I am sure it is obvious to everyone here, I am still troubled by the fact that a man, whom I esteemed, went to his grave with a false perception of how I felt about him.  In his eyes I will be always known as the teenager who gave him the 1 finger salute.

Hopefully, those of you who grew up in a small town, or just grew up for that matter, can identify with my frustration and sadness regarding his perception.  It is one thing to be thought of poorly for the things that you actually do, and another thing entirely when you are thought of poorly for things that you didn’t do.  Yet, the reality is that once a mind is “made up” or an opinion is formed they are almost impossible to change.  This reality, though I believe He never gave anybody the 1 finger salute, is exactly what Jesus encountered that day in his home town, at his home church, in front of his home town people.

What we share in common with the people of Jesus’s home town is that we too have the ability to accept or reject Jesus.  In addition, we, like them, often have misconceived constructs and beliefs regarding the reality of Jesus that oftentimes prevent us from truly seeing Jesus.  The challenge presented to us today in this Gospel rings true just as clearly as it did some 2000 odd years ago.  Jesus Christ is here in our midst.  He is present in this Church, in his people, and most specifically in the Eucharist.  My question for you today is… “Can you see him?”  I mean “really” see him!

Do you see Jesus?  Or, have you looked past him, through him, or around him?  Have you allowed false teachings, made-up traditions, personal biases, and prejudices to close off your heart and mind to Jesus?  Have you created a concept of Jesus that may not reflect his true person and purpose?  Have you put limits and barriers on God’s love because they do not conform to your own self-serving expectations and ideals?  Have you ever come away from the altar disappointed or discouraged because your felt like Jesus wasn’t there? The question you need to ask yourself is it because you are looking for Jesus NOT as he is, but rather as you want him to be?

The Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches, “The desire for God is written in the human heart” and, as a result, humanity will find only in God the truth and happiness we desire.  Simply stated, all of us, each and every one, are on a quest to find God.  We are created by God in love, held in existence by his love, and will only be truly fulfilled when we acknowledge and accept his love.  And yet, therein lies our problem, our willingness to acknowledge and accept God’s love.

God’s love for you, for me, and for the entire world cannot be lessened or diminished.  However, God’s love can be rejected.  St. Julian of Norwich, the 14th century theologian and anchoress, writes in her Divine Revelations, “Some of us believe that God is almighty, and can do everything; and that he is all wise, and may do everything; but that he is all love, and will do everything— there we draw back.”

On that day, when Jesus entered the synagogue in his home town, his audience was no less in need of his love and healing.  There, among his family and friends, were those who were afflicted and suffering.  Their lives were devoid of joy and peace and they were in desperate need of the divine gift of God’s love, Jesus.  Yet, they doubted and rationalized their disbelief with questions of authority and lineage and ultimately rejected the very cure for their misery.

Do not be like them.  Do not let your disbelief get in the way of God’s love.  Challenge yourself to push against the self-created expectations, opinions, and beliefs created to isolate, protect, and ensure your status quo.  Allow God’s love to collapse and crumble those walls and then experience the wonder of God’s all-encompassing love.

As you come before the altar of God today, come expecting to see Jesus.  Expect him to transform you in, with, and through his love so that you can fully live… and let your heart be made complete.

“What, then, will this child be?”

Solemnity of the Nativity of John the Baptist

“What, then, will this child be?”  Mark records the very question that every parent has asked since the dawn of time.  The question, “How will my kid turn out?” has the ability to cause feelings of wonder and hope or shock and dismay.  If it were possible to add up the total number of hours of sleep lost as a result of pondering this question, we as parents, would be both impressed and frightened.  As we read the recorded words of John the Baptist’s relatives we may take some small comfort in knowing that the mystery, wonder, and worry associated with parenting transcends race, culture, and time.

There is no such thing as “winning” at parenting.  You cannot win at being a parent.  There are no prizes.  There are no trophies.  There are no ribbons.  There are no participation medals.  In spite of what you may think, read, or have been told your children’s successes, or failures, are completely and entirely their sole responsibility.

I recognize that may sound a little harsh.  In fact, when I shared this viewpoint with a group of dads earlier this week most of them, initially balked at its bluntness.  As parents we like to think that we what we do matters…and though it does, it does so in a way that has more to do with our ability to parent rather than our children’s ability to be successful.

Many years ago, as I was eagerly anticipating the birth of my first child, a co-worker pulled me aside and told me in a very crude and direct manner what to expect at the birth. He said, “Of all the things you get when your baby is born there are two things they don’t give you; 1) an owner’s manual, and 2) a receipt.”  In his unique and brusque manner he gave me the best parenting advice ever; a reminder that children don’t come with instructions and they can’t be returned.

Proverbs 22:6 states, “train the young in the way they should go; even when old they will not swerve from it.”  As a parent I hold tightly to that proverb.  It brings me comfort and hope and I pass that proverb on to you in the hope that you too will find comfort and hope in the promise of God.  However, even in this proverb we find the reality that as parents we do our best in the hope that our best is good enough.

Believe it or not my hope today is to encourage you.  I wish to encourage you as parents, both current and future, by reminding you of your sacred duty to raise your children in love and with hope.  As today’s Gospel reminds us, the birth of a child is a wellspring of hope.  As the relatives and neighbors of John the Baptist exclaimed, “What, then, will this child be?” so too we find hope and promise in our children, not only in their birth but also as they grow and develop.

The supreme example of parenting is, of course, God the Father.  As reveled to us in his Word, in his creation, and in his Son, Jesus Christ, we know that God the Father is love and his mercy is the source of our hope.  As parents we should strive in all that we do and say to emulate God’s love for our children.  Through and with love, we communicate hope, and through that hope we provide encouragement as we inspire, motivate, and disciple our children.

Parenting out of love requires us too consciously, and with effort, to remove fear from our words and actions.  Fear seeks validation through success and when success is not achieved the fruits produced are feelings of rejection and unworthiness.  Fear communicates to our children that their worthiness is conditional, based on outcomes and performance, and denies our children the opportunity to experience the joy and stability produced from love without conditions.

Parents are charged with communicating God’s love to their children, for, ultimately, they are his.  We communicate love in everything we do; when we hold and squeeze our babies, when we establish and enforce boundaries for our teenagers, when we allow natural consequences, both positive and negative, to run their course, and when we provide instruction, advice, and encouragement.  In all these things, and many more, we must communicate love.

God, in his infinite wisdom and by his immeasurable love, created us, humankind, with the ability to choose. The ability to choose to accept or reject him.  It is with that example of God’s love, through which we have been called, by which we must parent.  Exposing our children to choice, exposes them to risk.  As parents we manage risk, the best we can, by managing choice.  We communicate love to our children when we allow and provide opportunities for appropriate risk, and when combined with our acceptance that failure and success are equally viable outcomes, we allow hope, an unfathomable wellspring, to encourage, inspire, and heal our children.

Today’s Gospel is a message of hope.  Hope in God and his promise to save all of humankind through the salvation made available to us through his son, Jesus Christ.  I ask you this day, as you come to the altar of God, to ask for his mercy and grace, through which all fear is vanquished, so that we, the family of God, may parent, in all its facets and forms, with the unconditional love of God.  A love that in turn brings hope…hope to all, each and every one of us.

Following my senior year of high school

10th Sunday Ordinary Time
Gospel of Mark 3:20-35

Following my senior year of high school, at the conclusion of that summer, I set out upon the first real adventure of my young life. I stuffed my car full with clothes and stereo components (because in the 80’s stereos didn’t fit in pockets) and left the tiny town of Buffalo, Wyoming. I left that day with the goal of accomplishing 2 things; 1) to eventually arrive in the city of Bartlesville, Oklahoma where I was enrolled for college, and 2) get away from Buffalo, Wyoming as quickly as possible.

Don’t get me wrong, I didn’t hate my home town, nor was I trying to escape or leave my family, but at that moment in my life I felt like I had to get out of there. It was almost a need. As if I needed to be somewhere else, anywhere else, other than there.

And so, on that hot summer August day in 1988, while Yellowstone burned, I left Buffalo, Wyoming in my stuffed to the roof, 1981, Midnight Blue, Ford Mustang and set upon an adventure.

As I look back on that time in my life I have come to the conclusion that what I lacked in wisdom, prudence, patience, and common sense I made up for in sheer stupidity. However, and I sincerely mean this, there is not one moment, not one minute, that I would exchange or trade. Now, that doesn’t mean I sometimes think about what could have happened if I had done some things differently, but I wouldn’t exchange a one of them.

Today’s Gospel reading in Mark caused me to recall a moment that occurred early on in my young adult life. To be honest it is a rather benign moment, neither good nor bad, and frankly I am surprised I recall it all, yet, I find a truth in that moment that I believe has some relevance to today’s Gospel.

After having been gone from my childhood home for a while I returned for a visit. As is the norm my mother prepared the meal, set the table, and called us to dinner. I entered the dining room only to discover that my brother was sitting in my usual spot. I will admit that for a moment, and not too brief of a moment mind you, I experienced a feeling of annoyance, combined with a touch of irritation, and I seriously considered saying something about my brother’s apparent lack of respect for the unwritten rules of the house. I chose to keep my mouth shut and, instead, took the next available seat.

The unwritten rules of a family. All families have them. In today’s Gospel, Mark, in his succinct and direct manner, provides us with an insight to one of the unwritten rules of Jesus’s family.

Marks tells us this, “Jesus came home with his disciples. Again the crowd gathered making it impossible for them to even eat. When his relatives heard of this they set out to seize him, for they said, ‘He is out of his mind.’” First of all, tell me that isn’t funny. Second, and to my point, even Jesus’s family had unwritten rules.

Imagine with me, if you will, just for a moment, what that day must have been like for Jesus’s family. Their 30-some year old family member returns home after having been away. He brings a “gang” he calls disciples. He has no job. He has no home, and apparently, no aspiration to obtain either. He keeps saying absolutely crazy stuff like; “Love your neighbor as yourself”, “pray for your enemies”, and “be like the birds of the air and the lilies of the field.” And, I believe this is the one that really put them over the top, “Not everyone who calls me Lord, Lord shall enter the Kingdom of Heaven, but he does the will of my Father.”

Jesus’s family were so frustrated that, according to Mark, they set out to seize him. They fully intended to lay hands on him, restrict him, and prevent him from continuing on in this absolutely crazy adventure. They were so desperate to stop Jesus they even invented theories about him being possessed by the devil. They wanted Jesus to stop. They had had enough.

Yet, we know that Jesus didn’t stop. He continued to preach, teach, and draw people to him. He continued to heal the sick, feed the hungry, and call people to repentance. Jesus was so revolutionary that even his own family did not understand him, and yet it was because of him, and his revolutionary love, that the world found its salvation.

There are times, I propose, that we forget, or diminish, the humanity of Jesus. How he grew up in a family, in a home, in a community and how hurt he must have been by their confusion and lack of understanding. We forget that he too experienced the hurt caused by family and friends who doubted his claims and ignored his love. Do not doubt for a minute that Jesus Christ, the Savior of you, me, and the entire world, did not know the hurt of living this life.

It has been a tough week for us, our church family, and I believe that the difficulties and struggles have not yet subsided. However, my brother’s and sister’s in Christ, do not lose hope for the wondrous grace and mercy of God is present in his Church, in his Body and Blood, and in each other. We boldly and confidently accept the opportunity presented to us to serve one another in the revolutionary love of Jesus, and, through the unfathomable well of his mercy, which is being poured out for us, we take confidence in the power of the Holy Spirt, knowing what Christ accomplishes in us and through us will change our lives and the lives of the people around us.

I challenge you this week and in the weeks to come to answer the call…the call to love revolutionary. Take initiative and visit the sick, the homebound, and the imprisoned. Schedule time for prayer, especially prayer in front of the Blessed Sacrament, and allow God to call you to and prepare you for his service. Reach out to your neighbor in love and in charity. Live in peace with one another. Make right a wrong, correct an error, and repair what is broken. Live your life revolutionary…through the revolutionary love of Jesus.

St. Mother Teresa started each day in prayer

Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ

It is said that St. Mother Teresa started each day in prayer in front of the Blessed Sacrament.  She is also recorded as saying, “You are called to do more than say, ‘I love you Jesus.’ You are called to be your brother’s and sister’s keepers.”  Her devotion to the Blessed Sacrament combined with her service of others embodies the spirit and purpose of today’s Solemnity, The Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ, or more commonly referred to, Corpus Christi Sunday.

For us Catholics, today’s Solemnity is significant in that it draws our focus towards two manifestations of the Body of Christ:  the Holy Eucharist and the Church.  Much like the previous Sunday’s solemnity, The Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity, we, the faithful, are called to celebrate one of the great mysteries of the Church.  We are called to reflect upon and profess our sacred belief that the Body of Christ is present and real in both the Eucharist and in his Church.

Throughout history, God has called all of humanity to himself.  It is his desire to make men holy and save them, but not just as individuals, but as a people, a people of God.  A people who are bound and connected to one another.  He created this bond through the establishment of a covenant.  A covenant he made with a people whom he called.

In today’s first reading we heard how God established this covenant with his people through Moses (the law) and through blood, the blood of animals.  This covenant was a pre-figure, a preparation for, the New Covenant, the eternal and perfect covenant instituted by Christ though his sacrifice upon the cross.  This New Covenant, ratified in the blood of Christ, allows all of humanity, both Jew and Gentile, to become one race, not in the flesh, but rather, in Spirit.

As the people of God we perpetuate this mystery, this New Covenant, through the celebration of the Eucharist.  As recorded in today’s Gospel, Jesus gave the supreme expression of his sacrifice for the salvation of men at the Lord’s Supper when he proclaimed, “This is my body which is given for you.” “This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many.”  He transformed this Last Supper with his disciples into the memorial of his voluntary sacrifice, which, in turn, has been perpetuated throughout the Age of the Church by his Apostles and their successors.

We acknowledge the physical and mystical presence of Christ in the Eucharist when we stand before the Host and profess, “Amen.”  By our “Amen” we attest that the offering of bread and wine do indeed become, through the power of the Holy Spirit and by the words of Christ, the real and physical Body and Blood of Christ.  We also attest, as the Catechism states, that those who have been nourished by the Body of Christ then also become the Body of Christ.

The mystical Body of Christ, the Church, are those who have been born of the Spirit and have been baptized in the name of the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit.  Through our profession of faith, and by the power of the Holy Spirit, we then become the Church, the body of Christ.  Our role as the Body of Christ is to then engage in his work; the mission to make disciples of all nations.

It is my fear that as our society has become more polarized and divided, that we, the Church, have allowed ourselves to mimic, or copy this attitude of division.  We, as the Body of Christ, I fear, have succumbed to the lure of division and isolation and have, instead, turned our attention to the things which divide us, rather than the reality which unites us.  This reality which unites us all, is that each and every one of us are in need of salvation.  The salvation offered through the redemptive work of Jesus Christ on the cross at Calvary.

On this day, this day of celebration, the Solemnity of the Body and Blood of Christ, I challenge you to not only profess your faith with your “amen”, but that you also profess your faith in this mystery by your actions.

When you receive the Eucharist you are in fact allowing yourself to be transformed by that which you consume.  You are not only professing your faith in the great mystery but you are also committing yourself to be an active participant in the missionary work of the Church.  When you reach out to those who are suffering, to those who are hungry, sick, and imprisoned in doubt, fear, and shame you are in fact reaching out with the very hands of Jesus.

I ask you to reflect upon the example left to us by St. Mother Teresa.  Her daily devotion to prayer in front of the Blessed Sacrament manifested in her a daily commitment to be the Body of Christ to those whom she served.  She embodied the reality that those who are nourished by the Body of Christ also become the Body of Christ.  Become the Body of Christ for someone else today.  Let them see in you this mystery…the mystery of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ.

“In the name of the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit”…

Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity

“In the name of the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit”… this is not only the most effective way of getting the attention of a room full of Catholics, but it is also our most basic and simplest profession of faith.  As we cross ourselves and call out in the name of the Most Holy Trinity we are, in essence, acknowledging our belief in the greatest two mysteries of the Church; the redemption obtained for us by Christ through his salvific work on the cross and the three distinct persons of the Most Holy Trinity.  Today, in the modern age, the significance of this simple profession of faith may be somewhat diminished, but its importance and relevance is essential and necessary to the life and well-being of the Church.

The development of the doctrine of the Most Holy Trinity was not without controversy and conflict.  Throughout the centuries the church’s efforts to clarify this teaching required many councils and the theological work of many Church Fathers.  The doctrine itself, after years of struggle against heresy and false doctrine, was ultimately formulated in both the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215 and, finally, in the Council of Florence in 1442.

The doctrine of the Holy Trinity is considered to be the central mystery of the Christian faith.  Though we, as modern day disciples of Christ, may not truly appreciate the struggle and the effort represented in the simple act of crossing ourselves “In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit”, this profession of faith did not come to us without struggle and sacrifice.  Countless men and women endured and preserved in order that this essential truth remained firmly at the center of our faith and witness.

It is this central belief in the mystery and power of the Most Holy Trinity which we find in today’s Gospel reading.  It is also in today’s Gospel reading that we find the challenge given to us by our Lord and Savior.  The challenge of living our faith in such a manner that others will also become disciples of Christ.

In order to meet this challenge we must first be willing to examine our life and how we live it.  We must ask ourselves difficult questions.  Questions such as, “How am I fulfilling the command of Christ to go and make disciples?”, and, “Am I intentionally, purposefully, prayerfully, and visibly living each day in order to fulfill this challenge?”

As Catholics we sometimes fall into the trap of; that is what the Priests and Deacons are supposed to do.  They are responsible for baptizing and instructing.  As good Catholics we are only required to pray, pay, and obey. We are not responsible for making disciples.

Christ’s call to “go and make disciples” is universal and encompasses all who call themselves followers of Christ.  It is not a right, a privilege, or even a “calling”; it is a commission.  A commission from our Lord and Savior to spread his light and love throughout all the world; regardless of title, position, or ordination.

Jesus Christ called his disciples to him on the mountain and, in spite of their doubt, commissioned them to go and make disciples.  We, the fruit of their labor, are held to that same expectation.  Though our individual responsibilities and authority vary according to our unique and specific gifts and talents we all have opportunity to teach and guide others in the ways of our Lord.

We teach others by how we live.  When we stand up against injustice; when we show kindness; when we take the time to listen; when we respond in love; when we provide comfort and support; when we offer friendship; when we give direction… we are teaching others what we have learned from those holy men and women who gone before us.

Our responsibility to make disciples does not require formal formation and the Sacrament of Ordination.  Our responsibility to make disciples rests in our willingness to let Christ, through the mystery and power of the Holy Spirit, to minister through us.  This willingness comes from a choice.  A choice to fulfill the commission of Christ to go and make disciples.

Today we celebrate the birth of the Church

Pentecost – Solemnity

Happy birthday everybody. Or, I guess I should use the proper name for this solemn day…Pentecost. So…Happy Pentecost everybody.

Today we celebrate the birth of the Church. Roughly, some 2000 plus years ago, on this day, 50 days after Easter, the Holy Spirit descended upon the Apostles, manifested in the sound of a mighty wind and in tongues of fire and filled all who were present with power and grace. This event, as recorded by St. Luke in the 2nd chapter of the book of the Acts of the Apostles, marks the beginning of the “age of the Church.”

This solemn day of Pentecost finds its beginnings in the ancient Jewish festival of the same name, but is also known as the “Festival of Weeks.” In the ancient Jewish tradition, Pentecost consisted of a seven-week season committed to celebration and thanksgiving. By the end of the 2nd century, Pentecost in the Christian tradition, had manifested itself into a 50-day festival starting immediately after Passover. During this time, fasting and kneeling were prohibited as it was a designated period of rejoicing and celebration. This practice of Pentecost continued late into the 4th century when the Feast of the Ascension was added at the 40th day following Easter. It was then, around this period of time, that the celebration of Pentecost as a 50-day celebration was interrupted and the 50th day following Easter was begun to be observed as Pentecost.

I share with you this brief history lesson not just in hopes of providing a little education, but also in hopes of providing a little inspiration.

Our Catholic Church since the 1st Pentecost, has rejoiced and celebrated her birthday from the very beginning. From her very inception, our Catholic Church has remembered her origin and her mission by recalling that glorious and mysterious day. A day in which a promise had been fulfilled. A promise to send an Advocate. An Advocate of truth who guides and empowers the Church to fulfill her commission to spread the Gospel throughout all the world. This commission to spread the Gospel is as real, and as vibrant, and as necessary today as it was 2000 years ago.

I recognize that this commission is a challenge. It is indeed as much a challenge to carry out today as it was for those who have gone before us as they set the example for us. This challenge to live out the command of Jesus Christ to go and spread the Gospel, baptizing and making disciples, is not an easy task, nor was it ever intended to be. Yet, as made evident to us through all three of today’s readings, the expectation to evangelize the world was given to us not without help nor without power.

This power, though not necessarily manifested in the same manner as it was some 2000 years ago, is available to each and every one of us here today. This power, manifested in both word and deed, allowed the Apostles to go forth and boldly proclaim the Good News of Jesus Christ, and is of the same source which guides and directs Christ’s Church today. This power, this power of the Holy Spirit, has been given to those who have been confirmed by the Church in full measure and it is we who are responsible for carrying out the mission and purpose to evangelize and build the kingdom of God here on earth.

Now, there is a cynical and grumpy man who has been known to not have such a high esteem of birthdays. He has been heard to say on more than once occasion, and in his typical curmudgeonly way, something that sounds a lot like this, “Why do people always want to celebrate their birthday? Really, all you have to do to have a birthday is not die in the past 365 days.”

Cynical, grumpy, curmudgeonly men notwithstanding, I challenge you this most solemn and holy birthday to make the next 365 days a year worth celebrating. A year worth celebrating because you endeavored to make it a year worth living. A year worth living not just for yourselves, but a year worth living for your faith, for your Church, and for your Savior.

During the next 365 days, each and every day, you have an opportunity to make a difference in the world in which you live, and in the life you are living. You have an opportunity to show a kindness to someone whose life is full of bitterness and regret. Or, to demonstrate God’s justice by allowing yourself to be an instrument of his mercy to someone who is desperate and full of despair. You have the ability to act in charity by not only giving out of your abundance, but also by giving out of what you have in short supply. This year can be the year you make a friend out of an enemy and promote peace and cooperation instead of conflict and division.

God willing, you have 365 days to prepare yourselves for what ought to be a most glorious and wondrous celebration. A celebration resulting from your cooperation with the Spirit of God to effect positive change in your world through the fulfillment of the great commission of Jesus Christ by spreading the Gospel to all of your world. A celebration, I remind you, which has continued on throughout history…the celebration of the birthday of the church…which started in a small room full of people who were willing to allow themselves to be empowered by the Holy Spirit and make a difference in their world.

Of my many weaknesses,

6th Sunday of Easter
Gospel of St. John 15:9-17

Of my many weaknesses, and there are a few, my tendency to “overthink” solutions to problems is one with which I struggle. This weakness causes me to look past the clear and simple solution of a problem, and instead, direct my focus towards the more complex and complicated one. This expense of unnecessary energy and effort has on many an occasion resulted in failure and discouragement and leaves me right where I started; having a problem in need of a solution. I wish I could tell you that as I have grown older, I have been able to eliminate this weakness, however, that would not be entirely true. Yet, that does not mean I am not without a solution. It just means that I don’t always apply it. So, today, I would like to share with you, those who may suffer from this same weakness, a solution. When faced with a problem or struggle the best way to find the fix is to…K.I.S.S it.

If you had a father like mine, you may be already familiar with the acronym K.I.S.S. For those of you who didn’t have a father like mine, I will fill you in. K.I.S.S stands for Keep It Simple… I will let you insert your own descriptor that starts with the letter “S” here. The idea behind this acronym is of course; when presented with a problem the best solution is typically the simplest solution.

Now, with all that being said, I propose that Jesus himself was a proponent of the K.I.S.S method as evidenced by his instruction to his disciples in today’s Gospel.

First, for a little context. If you recall last week’s Gospel reading, Jesus was instructing his disciples about the importance of “remaining” in the vine in order to produce fruit. He said that since he was the vine, and that God, his father, was the master gardener, it is imperative that we, his disciples, remain in him in order that we bear fruit.

If you are like me, then your response upon hearing Jesus’s instruction to “remain” in the vine, may have been to develop of a complicated set of rules. We might have created systems and mechanisms that govern behaviors, attitudes, and appearance. We may have created rules about the places where we can go or the people with whom we associate.  We did this in hopes that these rules will keep us attached to the vine. Rules that we believe would allow us to meet all the perceived nuances and subtleties of our faith and therefore allow us to be considered obedient followers of Christ.

You see, there is comfort in rules. Rules direct our charity, dictate our relationships, and define our roles in our communities and allow us to feel comfortable in a chaotic, lost, and out of control world. Rules provide comfort and support and, typically, when we feel comfortable and supported we tend to think that our rules our right. Once we have convinced ourselves that our rules are right we then come to believe that we are right. And when we come to believe that we are right because of our rules, we are then no longer dependent on the vine, the source of our righteousness, Jesus Christ.

Jesus, the vine, the source of our righteousness, has only one rule, “love one another as I love you.” The quintessential K.I.S.S method, if you will, simple, clear, and direct. His promise for obeying his only rule; “If you keep my commandment you will remain in my love.” To love one another is to remain dependent upon the vine, Jesus Christ.

As I mentioned previously, rules provide comfort, stability, and support. However, the love that Jesus is commanding us to emulate is a love that motivates us to step out of our comfort zone and experience the insecurity and vulnerability of taking risks. Risks that involve offering refuge to the displaced and disadvantaged. Risks that require the removal of labels and ideologies and insisting that our all our human interactions first begin with respect and dignity. Risks that are associated with responding to challenges and struggles in love.

The love that Jesus is speaking of in today’s Gospel is transformative and allows us to be in right relationship with him and with one another. We are his friends and we are friends one with another. We are not slaves or servants who are valued because of our ability to adhere to rules and perform tasks; rather, we are called to relationship, a friendship founded and forged in love and fellowship.

This love is not designed to make us feel comfortable. That is not the ultimate goal of this love. Rather, this love will challenge us to re-examine the rules that govern our behaviors, beliefs, attitudes. This love will cause us to speak kindly to people that we previously ignored and will cause us to engage in service that was once “just something we don’t do.” This love will cause us to look upon the suffering of others and allow us to see ourselves, and our savior, Jesus, in their pain and misery. This love will cause us to respond to that suffering first with love knowing that is exactly how Jesus responds to our suffering.

To love one another as Jesus loves is the simplest commandment. To live out this commandment however, becomes our greatest challenge. There are a host of problems that confront our society, affect our decisions, and cause us to seek the comfort of rules. May we, I pray, respond to these problems; these problems that challenge our positions, opinions, and beliefs, as Jesus commanded… may we respond first in love.